Sonnedix, First Solar Mark Completion of 7.5 MW Nakhon Ratchasima Solar Farm, Largest First Solar Plant in South-East Asia

published: 2012-02-24 15:22 | editor: | category: News

Sonnedix Group and First Solar, Inc. (Nasdaq: FSLR) announced the completion of the Nakhon Ratchasima Solar Farm in Khorat region, northeastern Thailand. The 7.5 megawatt (MW) (DC) solar power plant-one of the biggest to-date in Thailand-was built by Sonnedix with support of Assyce Fotovoltaica and Ch. Karnchang Group using around 95,000 of First Solar's innovative, thin-film solar modules.

"As a global solar independent power producer whose management has an extensive track record of more than fifteen years in Asia," said Sonnedix Chairman Franck Constant. "We are confident that this project, our first to become operational in Thailand, will serve as a strong base for our strategy of developing and building utility-size world-class solar farms and large rooftop solar power plants. It is our view that solar PV should be a mainstream power source in Thailand."

"The completion of the Nakhon Ratchasima Solar Farm is a considerable achievement and supports our commitment, shared with the Thai government, of reducing fossil fuel dependence and greenhouse gas emissions," said Jack Curtis, First Solar Vice President, Sales and Business Development. "We believe that this project and others like it in Thailand will greatly benefit from our low-cost, environmentally leading technology, which has the smallest carbon footprint of any current PV technology."

"We are delighted to have partnered with the Sonnedix Group on this project in Thailand and to be working with Thai authorities as they increasingly adopt utility-scale PV solar as a clean, affordable source of renewable energy," said Kevin Berkemeyer, First Solar Senior Manager, Business Development. "We look forward to helping Thailand meet its energy needs and enhancing its energy security."

Covering around 20 hectares, the Nakhon Ratchasima Solar Farm can supply enough electricity to meet the annual needs of about 5,100 average Thai homes. It is expected to generate more than 10,500 megawatt hours of clean, green electricity per year, offsetting carbon dioxide emissions of more than 6,500 tons a year. A Buddhist inauguration ceremony took place at the power plant last week.

The modules in the project are covered by First Solar's industry-leading, prefunded module and recycling program.

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